Overtourism: From Venice to Marseilles, here’s how European travel hotspots are tackling overtourism

Overtourism: From Venice to Marseilles, here’s how European travel hotspots are tackling overtourism

From cruise-ship taxes to number plate systems, here’s how Europe’s travel hotspots are coping with overtourism.

Marseille is introducing tough new restrictions to help save its beautiful coast from overtourism.

The French destination is the latest European travel hotspot struggling to cope with a high number of visitors.

The region is known for its stunning ‘calanques,’ cliff-lined coastal inlets sheltering tiny, azure coves.

But this rugged landscape is under threat, as the traffic of thousands of tourists erodes coastal soil and threatens native vegetation.

To limit the damage, the national park is introducing a permit system. It’s just one in a series of innovative solutions being introduced by over-subscribed European destinations as travel picks up this summer.

From cruise-ship taxes to number plate systems, here’s how Europe’s travel hotspots are coping with overtourism.

Marseille introduces a permit system
From the end of June to the end of August, visitors will have to apply online for a permit to access the popular Sugiton calanque and its beach.

Amalfi coast number plate rules
Italy’s Amalfi coast is known for its turquoise coves and lofty cliffs – but also for its dangerously narrow roads and hours-long traffic queues.

Spain bans excessive alcohol and football shirts
Some hotspots don’t necessarily have a problem with the number of visitors they receive – but with the way that these visitors behave.

Venice bans cruiseships

Venice has long suffered from a surplus of tourists. In peak season, the city of just 50,000 residents can receive up to 150,000 tourists per day.

Barcelona proposes a tax on cruises
Visitors to Barcelona are already charged a tourist levy, coughing up €3 for a stay of more than 12 hours and €1 for a stay of less than 12 hours. These costs – along with an existing €1.75 surcharge – are usually included in the price of booking cruises or hotels.

This is an excerpt from a press release by Paul Stevens, originally published by euronews.travel.

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