What COVID-19 can teach tourism about the climate crisis

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The global coronavirus pandemic has hit the tourism industry hard worldwide. Not only that, but it has exposed a lack of resilience to any type of downturn, according to new research from Lund University in Sweden. While the virus may or may not be temporary, the climate crisis is here to stay—and tourism will have to adapt, says Stefan Gössling, professor of sustainable tourism.

Tourism has been under pressure even before the current pandemic paralyzed the world. The has seen declining profits, and flying has become cheaper. The platform economy—AirBnB, booking.com and TripAdvisor, to name some of the few dominant global players—has further toughened the market. Tourists book shorter stays, meaning destinations have to attract a higher volume of travelers.

“Even though we have warned for decades that a virus, for example SARS, could significantly affect tourism, nobody expected a virus to have this kind of impact,” says Stefan Gössling.

In the same way, there have been clues that another looming crisis is starting to affect tourism. The demise of UK tour operator Thomas Cook in 2019 was attributed to the summer heatwave leading to fewer bookings—and the heatwave has, in turn, been attributed to a changing .

“Imagine several crises of similar magnitude to COVID-19. Extreme and unpredictable weather, a global food shortage or other consequences of climate change. And since this will possibly go on for longer than the current pandemic, the will suffer greatly,” says Stefan Gössling.

This is an excerpt from an article by Stefan Gössling et al. from Lund University, originally published on PHYS.ORG.

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